Why Does Topical Magnesium Sting!

Why Does Topical Magnesium Sting? - A Pretty Place to Play, London Running and Fitness Blog

Magnesium is one of the most important minerals when it comes to sport performance. It plays a fundamental role in optimal muscle contraction, skeletal strength and energy production, as well as helping to sustain the high oxygen consumption that we need to perform. A growing number of studies suggest that magnesium is most effectively absorbed when applied to the skin (something called transdermal absorption) in comparison to taking it in pill or capsule form orally. That sounds really nerdy doesn’t it! Well let’s put it this way, applying a magnesium oil or gel to your legs will help you recover more quickly that popping a magnesium supplement each day. But there is one major drawback…IT STINGS LIKE HELL.

Why Does Topical Magnesium Sting? - A Pretty Place to Play, London Running and Fitness Blog

For ages I thought that it was just me who felt like their legs were on fire after applying magnesium, but chatting with other runners (which is pretty much all I do these days) I discovered that a lot of people have had the same experience, and it’s really putting them off doing something that’ll really benefit their bodies. Being someone whose job is essentially to ask ‘why’ a lot I really wanted to understand why topical magnesium stings so much, and whether there was anything I could do to stop the stinging, so I reached out to the team at BetterYou to ask some questions.

Why Does Topical Magnesium Sting? - A Pretty Place to Play, London Running and Fitness Blog

According to NPD Executive and Nutritional Expert, Keeley Berry, high dose magnesium can sting because it’s highly concentrated salt and it’s absorbed super quickly. While this has huge benefits when it comes to helping you recover, it can also mean that you’re left with a bit of residue on your skin which can cause some itching, especially if you’ve got sensitive skin (hands up!). Stinging or burning could also be a sign of magnesium deficiency, and when the skin is exposed to topical magnesium it can cause the blood vessels underneath the skin to dilate very quickly. This is because magnesium is a natural vasodilator and can cause the capillaries to increase in blood flow, also causing a tingling warming effect.

So that’s the science explaining why topical magnesium can sting, but what can you do about it? Here’s a few suggestions:

  • it’s always better to apply little and often to a larger surface area, especially if you’re just starting out with a magnesium oil.

  • the best way to avoid itchy residue to to apply gel or oil onto wet skin straight out of the shower. Warm water (not too hot!) helps open up the pores and allows the product to be absorbed more efficiently, especially when massaged into the skin. After a few minutes towel off any residual oil, which should help minimise any itching.

  • Noushii (the bad ass manager at City Athletic) suggests starting with the sensitive oil from BetterYou, it’s just a bit kinder if you have sensitive skin.

  • Try adding magnesium flakes to your bath, I’ve never experienced stinging, and who doesn’t like a good soak?! I like to add a couple of drops of essential oils too, just to make things a bit more lux.


Do you use topical magnesium? Do you find it stings? Any tips I’ve missed to stop the sting?!

* I reached out to BetterYou for comment, I have not received payment and the products features I purchased myself. My shoes were a gift from 361 Europe.

** images: Anna Rachel Photography


 





Expert Tips for Lacing Your Trainers

In collaboration with realbuzz.

Expert Tips for Lacing Your Trainers - A Pretty Place to Play, London Running and Fitness Blog

Like most runners I am obsessed with my trainers. I’m insanely lucky that I to get to try out loads of different shoes and I think that having the right shoes for the job is really important, whether it’s a pair of lighter shoes when you want to move quickly, something with some cushioning when you’re going far or a shoe that will protect your feet on the trails. But what’s even more important is that your shoes fit properly. Not only is a well fitting pair of trainers more comfortable to wear, they can also help prevent injuries spoiling all your fun.

One thing that can really affect how your shoes fit is how you lace them up. I don’t know about you, but I feel a huge difference if my laces are too tight or too loose. In fact before most races I can be found obsessively fiddling with them making sure that everything is just right! Lacing my shoes a particular way has a big impact on how comfortable my shoes are, and I was intrigued to hear from Louise Damen, a former GB athlete and realbuzz running expert, just how lacing techniques and patters can help resolve shoe related problems. Check out her advice below, and let me know if any of the tips work for you!

Expert Tips for Lacing Your Trainers - A Pretty Place to Play, London Running and Fitness Blog
Expert Tips for Lacing Your Trainers - A Pretty Place to Play, London Running and Fitness Blog

Toe problems

This technique allows you to create more space at the front of your trainer known as the toe box. It will help you to avoid unsightly and painful black toenails as well as other toe issues.

Expert Tips for Lacing Your Trainers - A Pretty Place to Play, London Running and Fitness Blog




Shoes too tight

A good way to combat this problem is by using parallel lacing to loosen up the pressure. It will allow the top of the foot to have more room while still ensuring there is enough support.

 

 

Expert Tips for Lacing Your Trainers - A Pretty Place to Play, London Running and Fitness Blog

High arches

You can minimise pressure on the top of your foot by feeding laces vertically through selected eyelets. Everyone’s feet are different though, so experiment which ones work best for you.

 

 

Expert Tips for Lacing Your Trainers - A Pretty Place to Play, London Running and Fitness Blog




Wide forefoot

If you’ve got a wide forefoot there are ways you can open up the shoe. This can be done by using vertical lacing further down to give that part of your foot plenty of room while you run.

 

 

 

Expert Tips for Lacing Your Trainers - A Pretty Place to Play, London Running and Fitness blog

Narrow feet

For narrow feet the best lacing technique is the criss-cross. This pattern is the best and most effective way to tighten the shoe for this type of foot.

 

 

Expert Tips for Lacing Your Trainers - A Pretty Place to Play, London Running and Fitness Blog

Heel slipping

Create a more compact fit to not only keep your heel in place but to reduce friction and minimise wear in the back of the shoe.

* This post is in collaboration with realbuzz. Images: Max Willcocks for 361 Europe.

Should I Sign Up For That Race?

Questions to Ask Yourself Before Signing Up for A Race - A Pretty Place to Play

I don’t know about you, but for the last week or so my feed has been a flurry of excitement as people hear whether they’ve secured a place for London Marathon, take the plunge and sign up for races inspired by friends who’ve raced recently and set themselves training goals for next spring. When your feed is awash with bling, PBs and race pictures it’s hard not to get swept up in the excitement and start signing up for everything under the sun.. It’s got me thinking about how hype influences our choices, and whether we’re really doing the right thing by our selves if we’re constantly racing? When we race too often we risk burn out, our bodies and our minds get tired. There are risks if we’ve not trained sufficiently, we could get injured or end up having to deal with the psychological impact of a disappointing performance. Plus it sucks to train for and run events that, quite honestly, you’re just not that in to.

I know I’m not immune to the noise, in the past I’ve been known to race every weekend for months, and even now it takes so much will power not to sign up for races. It’s hard when everyone around you is excited, when you feel like the only way you can push yourself is in a race environment and where there’s some seriously enviable bling on offer! So how do you make sure you make the right choices for you? I’ve asked PT, Backpackers Queen and all round brilliant person Megan Beggs to chat through the questions you should think about asking yourself before you press ‘buy’ on that race entry.

Questions to Ask Yourself Before Signing Up for a Race - A Pretty Place to Play

There seems to be key times of year when ballots open, ballots close and places become available for the next wave of races, and the running community tends to go a bit crazy. Suddenly everyone is talking about what races they’re doing, how excited they are and generally stirring up all sorts of excitement, and unfortunately too often people get caught up in the hype of it all and sign up for everything, due to  the FOMO, without actually thinking. 

Now as runners we all love to get involved but there a few key things I urge you all to think about before entering that next race.

Questions to Ask Yourself Before You Sign Up for A Race - A Pretty Place To Play

What other events do you have around race time?

Yes the race might be on a free weekend but are you stacked up with social events and other races around it? 

Great, A half / marathon in early March, that’s a free month but in the 3 months prior you have Christmas with the family, News Years with friends, two other fun races you’ve already signed up for and a skiing trip. Now that sounds like a wonderful 3 months but (1) how much energy are you going to have left over to run another race at the end of it? and (2) when will you fit in your training (see point 2 below)? 

Yes events are exciting and fun (both social and races) but they take a lot out of us mentally and physically. Put that on top of everything else going on in your life, plus the months of training for the event, and your body will be at breaking point! Cue injury and exhaustion! 

So grab yourself a yearly calendar, plaster it on your wall, write up all your events and use this to help you plan, before you sign up for that next event.

Questions to Ask Yourself Before Signing Up for a Race - A Pretty Place to Play

Will you be able to put in the training required?

Although a race is only one day, as I mentioned above the training should roughly cover the 3 months prior. Whether you’re a seasoned athlete or a beginner, you should always be putting in the training to prepare your body for a race. Even if you’re not after that PB (and who are we kidding the majority of us are!), your body needs time to adapt and prepare for the challenge of racing. If you want to come out the other side injure free, you need to be putting in 2-3 mid week runs, strength training, mobility training, weekend long runs and rest - all of which take up a large chunk of your life. Are you willing to make sacrifices to fit it all in? So again, make sure you check the months prior to ensure you can give your training and race 100%.

Questions To Ask Yourself Before Signing Up for A Race - A Pretty Place to Play

Is this what YOU actually want to do?

Will this race actually benefit your goals? It may sound great to sign up because everyone else is and the pressure / FOMO is real, but if it’s not a goal of yours or if it doesn’t help you progress towards your goals is it really worth it? Why run a marathon if your dream is to do a sub 2 hour half marathon? Yes a marathon might be right up there for your mate, but it doesn’t have to be on your bucket list. Why not tackle something that’ll help you smash your own goals, like some shorter distance races to work on your speed, and then a couple of halves throughout the year? Sit down, write out what you want out of running and use this list to make your choices every time a new race become available [pro tip - stick it up somewhere obvious at home, not only will it help you make smart decisions about race entries, it’ll also inspire your training!].

If you can follow these steps your next race year will be a stress free, fun and goal smashing time.